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2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

2010

Images from the opening of Here/There, Then/Now

2010

2010

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Created for a 2010 solo in Tehran, on the one year anniversary of the disputed Iranian elections. Inspired by the Shia flags of Muharram or the evening rituals in a Roseh. These flags secularize the symbology which would otherwise have image or text from the Quran. Since in Tehran, discussion of the events on and after the 2009 Iranian elections were dangerous and since the language of the state was to denounce oppression in the US, images from Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s 1964 voter registration campaign was used as a reflective critique. The flags are 48” x 96” hand stitched on velvet. Images of state violence used against Black Americans who wanted to engage in their right to vote, were used in place of the religious iconography depicting Imam Hussain and the Quranic quotes of justice.

2010

Images from the opening of Here/There, Then/Now

2010

2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010